Image Source: Freeimages.com/lisa fanucchi

Sooooo, a while back, I made a brief open post dedicated to the guy whose vocation seems to be serving as self-anointed unofficial doorman at the Dunkin’ Donuts I now frequent close to work. To borrow from Martin Lawrence with a dash of Wendy Williams, he’s become the friend in my head called Hustle Man since my commute changed slightly a year and a half ago.

While I maintain my posture that I owe my Hustle Man no financial compensation for holding the door open for me and other patrons, no matter how many times he calls me sweetheart or wishes me a Blessed day, I have come to respect his hustle.

I mean, the guilt-supported tax-free income he collects aside, I’ve noticed the following similarities between him and those of us working 9-ish to 5-ish gigs every day.

First, he shows up. Whether uninvited or not, he’s there every day. As Woody Allen famously said, “Eighty percent of success is showing up.” By that measure, Hustle Man is likely one of the most successful people I’ve ever met. At worst, he’s in the 20th percentile.

Second, he takes time off. There was one week when he wasn’t there and, gasp, we had to open the door ourselves. As I muddled through this extra bit of weightlifting and exercise I was forced to endure during his week off, I couldn’t help but notice that I actually noticed his absence.

Third, he outsources. Aside from his aforementioned week off, there have been a few days here and there where a substitute unofficial doorman has stood the post. These organizational and succession planning skills really got my attention. I also wondered if he, like Dunkin Donuts, has franchisees all over the City?

Fourth, he trains. Yes, trains – and not the kind that run under New York City. He pays it forward through succession planning.  Let me explain. I’ve actually witnessed Hustle Man mentoring other would be Hustle-ites and showing them the ropes. “Well, you know, the key is you have to know how to talk to people, you understand?” I heard him say to one would-be apprentice. His trainee responded, “Yeah, man, but I just don’t know if I can get up that early, know what I mean?” “I hear you, but you know what they say about that early bird,” Hustle Man responds, as the two share a hearty laugh and exchange brotherly dap. Something told me that particular intern might never become a full-time employee at HM Enterprises.

Seriously. You can’t make this stuff up. If I could, I might be writing for Disney or Shonda Rhimes out in Hollywood somewhere.

I’ll stop there for today and simply leave you to ponder what else Hustle Man knows that we have yet to figure out…and what else I could hear him say that might actually convince me to put a dollar in his cup.